Oh Terry! …Pratchett, that is…

I heard somewhere that the late Ray Bradbury used to say one should write “love letters” to one’s favorite authors, just to let them know how much you enjoyed what they did.  I thought maybe I’d take his advice before the time slips by and it becomes too late. The addressee is Terry Pratchett, a

Truth, Justice, and the Happy Ending

My brother says the main difference between “great” literature and the rest of it is that great literature isn’t allowed to have a happy ending. If there’s a happy ending to it, it automatically isn’t great. Of course he’s being a little facetious, but not much. There does seem to be some truth in the

Writers, readers, and breaking trust

Among the comments on my recent post about truth in fiction, was one from the norfolknovelist  in which she pointed out, among other things, that if you violate the truth in your fiction, your readers may decide they can’t trust you. This is a valid point, although it’s also clear that fiction writers routinely bend

On wolves, sheep, and truth in fiction

A while ago, G M Barlean (author of Casting Stones, and story-telling blogger extraordinaire) mentioned in a comment to one of my posts that the nonfiction writers in her writers’ group often asked the fiction writers about truth in fiction and that the ensuing discussions generally came around to the subject of the genres of

Why do we create fiction?

I strongly suspect that human beings have been telling stories for about as long as we have had language that was complex enough to make it possible. (One of the defining characteristics of complex language is that it allows you to talk about things you and have not seen, and be understood by a listener